Monthly Archives: April 2019

Sydney man Zane Alchin likely to plead guilty to harassing slut-shame protesters

Posted on by

Zane Alchin is expected to plead guilty. Photo: Nick MoirMan charged over slut shaming, harassment of Sydney woman for her Tinder profile
杭州龙凤

A Sydney man will likely plead guilty to harassing women who defended their friend from online slut-shaming, a court has heard.

Zane Alchin​, 25, appeared before Newtown Local Court on Thursday, charged with using a carriage service to menace, harass or offend.

His lawyer indicated Mr Alchin was expected to plead guilty to the crime, which carries a maximum penalty of three years’ imprisonment.

Mr Alchin allegedly committed the offence on a Facebook thread about the online abuse of Sydney woman Olivia Melville.

A photo of Ms Melville’s profile on the dating app Tinder had been uploaded to Facebook. Her profile caption quoted a lyric by the hip-hop artist Drake: “Type of girl who will suck you dry and then eat some lunch with you.”

Ms Melville was derided online by strangers. Her friends responded by reposting the original post and criticising the commenters for their attitudes toward women.

Mr Alchin is accused of harassing these friends in ranting, obscene comments, writing at one point “[sic] your all f—ing basic sluts”.

He also allegedly referred to “the best thing about raping feminists”. Fairfax Media has chosen not to publish other, more explicit messages in the series.

The alleged targets of the abuse told media they had reported the messages to police, who initially “offered little support to our case”.

They then began a Facebook group called “Sexual Violence Won’t Be Silenced”, which gained more than 8000 followers. Their petition to the governments of NSW and  for tighter laws and more resources to tackle online harassment gathered more than 15,000 signatures.

Mr Alchin was charged on Monday. “We would like to thank the Newtown Local Police for their hard work on this case,” the group wrote on Facebook.

“Not every person who experiences online violence has the time, resources or support network to start a campaign after being harassed. That’s why, regardless of the outcome of this legal case, SVWBS will continue to fight for better laws, training and education surrounding online harassment.”

Mr Alchin’s matter will return to court on December 8.

MOVIE REVIEW: The Dressmaker

Posted on by

THE DRESSMAKER (M)
杭州龙凤

Stars: Kate Winslet, Judy Davis, Liam Hemsworth, Kerry Fox, Shane Bourne, Hugo Weaving

Director: Jocelyn Moorhouse

Screening: general release

Rating: ★★★★

JOCELYN Moorhouse’s The Dressmaker is about the return of a prodigal daughter, and you might say it was made by one. While Moorhouse still has a high reputation as an n filmmaker, she has not shot a feature in her homeland since her debut Proof in the early ’90s. But this hectic, clattering Gothic farce, based on a novel by Rosalie Ham, finds her back with a vengeance.

In dead of night, the glamorous Tilly Dunnage (Kate Winslet) arrives in the remote wheatbelt town of Dungatar, her Singer sewing machine by her side. As we soon discover, this is the home she was sent away from as a child, under ambiguous circumstances, which saw her implicated in the death of a schoolmate.

Even now, in 1951, the rumours haven’t subsided: Tilly herself fears she may be cursed, and Mad Molly (Judy Davis), her cranky old bag of a mother, initially refuses to recognise her. But Tilly is determined to set things right, or at least find out what really happened on that fateful day. She moves into Molly’s hilltop shack and, having learned her trade in the great fashion houses of Europe, she sets about introducing the local matrons to the joys of haute couture.

Teddy McSwiney’s (Liam Hemsworth) role as Tilly Dunnage’s (Kate Winslet) love interest isn’t conventional.

Whatever may be suggested by this synopsis, The Dressmaker is not one of those sentimental fables in which a free-spirited stranger brings new life to a repressed community. Like many outback towns in n cinema, Dungatar is something of a hellhole, its very name suggesting a smelly place where the hapless get stuck.

Its citizens also tend to be given blunt allegorical names, from the vicious schoolteacher Beulah Harridiene (Kerry Fox) to the slimy civic leader Evan Pettyman (Shane Bourne).

Those few characters worthy of sympathy tend to be outsiders of one kind or another – such as Sergeant Horatio Farrat, a friendly policeman and closet transvestite played by Hugo Weaving.

Another partial outsider is Teddy McSwiney (Liam Hemsworth), a rugged hunk from a family of rubbish collectors who serves as Tilly’s love interest, though his role isn’t quite what it would be in a conventional feelgood entertainment.

The great scene-stealer is Davis, who’s able to make Molly into an outlandish comic figure without eliminating all nuance, since the shamelessness belongs as much to the character as to the performer. Molly may be a recluse, but she relishes having an audience to play to.

Truth be told, Moorhouse has so many characters and subplots to juggle that her storytelling can feel disjointed: some weighty developments are skated over so rapidly we might wonder if they really happened at all. On the other hand, the lurches from broad comedy to grim melodrama and back are evidently intentional – part of a strategy for throwing the viewer off-balance, along with the dramatic colour contrasts and spatial distortions of Don McAlpine’s cinematography.

This cartoonish yet confrontational approach recalls the work of Moorhouse’s husband P.J. Hogan, who collaborated with her on The Dressmaker’s script. Absent, however, is Hogan’s softness of heart. By the end, it’s clear that Moorhouse wasn’t joking when she publicly compared the plot of The Dressmaker to Clint Eastwood’s great revisionist Western Unforgiven – though the film could also be seen as the long-delayed feminist answer to Wake In Fright.

Either way, it’s not for nothing that Tilly’s favourite colour, bright red, evokes both fire and blood.

All questions of taste and plausibility aside, The Dressmaker is a hoot and a healthy shock to the system. n cinema may never be quite the same again.

MOVIE REVIEW: Burnt

Posted on by

BURNT (M)
杭州龙凤

Stars: Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Emma Thompson, Daniel Bruhl, Alicia Vikander, Uma Thurman

Director: John Wells

Screening: general release

Rating: ★★★

BRADLEY Cooper’s chef, Adam Jones, comes out of the Gordon Ramsay school of kitchen tantrum. At least he starts that way. Burnt is the story of his long and noisy journey towards the embrace of teamwork and a civilised demeanour.

How much you enjoy it is likely to depend on your taste for the cult of the celebrity chef. I’m resistant, so I spent much of the action wincing over the size of the seafood bill as he hurls successive plates of seared scallops and poached turbot fillets at the wall because they don’t meet his exacting standards.

Bradley Cooper’s intense, blue-eyed stare does a lot of the heavy lifting in Burnt.

The film is directed by John Wells, best known as showrunner for ER and The West Wing and, more recently, as the director of August: Osage County.

When we first meet Adam, he’s just arrived in London, having undergone a long rehabilitation after years of abusing drugs, alcohol and best friends, few of whom have any desire to see him again. Nonetheless, he perseveres – or rather, bullies them into giving him another chance. In particular, he persuades his long-suffering friend Tony (Daniel Bruhl), who happens to own the Langham Hotel, to let him take over the hotel’s restaurant.

Cooper’s intense, blue-eyed stare does a lot of the heavy lifting in these scenes. He also employs quite a bit of the fighting spirit that he sported in his last film, American Sniper. In that, his co-star was Sienna Miller, cast again here as a talented young chef.

There are many loving shots of colour co-ordinated helpings cunningly arranged on white plates. And they’re usually served up as part of a montage, a device that tends to be the first refuge of a director lumbered with a script lacking enough lines worth saying.

There is some banter, much of it wisely assigned to Emma Thompson as Adam’s therapist, and to Matthew Rhys, who does a great job as his former friend. But Adam himself is so pickled in his own ego that he wouldn’t know a witticism from a witlof.

TOPICS: Mumford & Sons give it up for Dungog heroes

Posted on by

Although hardly a classic situation, recent events at Newcastle City Council remind us of a certain novel.
杭州龙凤

Mumford & Sons have a soft spot for flood-hit Dungog, having played there in 2012. Local heroes of the town’s April floods have the opportunity to attend the band’s concert at The Domain on November 14 for free. Picture: Peter Stoop

BRITISH band Mumford & Sons have a special connection with Dungog.

The folk-rockers played there before a crowd of 10,000 people in 2012.

They didn’t forget the connection they made with the town that day.

The band has joined with Telstra to offer 400 free double passes to members of the Dungog community to attend a gig in The Domain on November 14.

The giveaway includes bus transfers from Dungog.

It’s all about recognising people who helped rebuild Dungog, following the April flood which devastated the town and took the lives of three people.

So get in there and nominate a local hero.

All you have to do is explain in 50 words or less why your nominee has shown ‘‘great community spirit’’.

Telstra area general manager Chris Cusack encouraged locals to get involved.

“We are honoured to be able to work with the band to reward some of the heroes who helped others in their time of need,’’ Mr Cusack said.

Entries can be made at telstra杭州龙凤论坛m/music.

A disgusting tale spawned from McDonald’s has been recalled.

TOPICS brought you the story yesterday about maggots found inside a bagged roast chicken bought from Waratah Coles.

This brought back a few memories for Derek Dowding, of Wallsend.

‘‘I had a similar encounter with a McOz burger from a local McDonald’s outlet in 1999,’’ Derek told Topics.

‘‘When the store manager failed to apologise for the wriggling maggot in my meal, I pursued it with head office and the health inspector.’’

Macky Dees sent him a letter, saying it did a ‘‘thorough investigation of your complaint’’.

The letter said Maccas referred the case to the University of NSW Department of Entomology for investigation.

The department ‘‘spent considerable time analysing the burger’’, the letter said.

‘‘They have been unable to identify anything that resembles insect origin.’’ Feeling a tad sceptical, Derek went back to the restaurant and confronted the manager.

‘‘He confessed the maggot was squashed and the burger was thrown in the bin,’’ Derek said.

‘‘The health inspector reported back saying he found a box of rotting tomatoes in the store and that was probably the source of my complaint.’’

Maccas said it was an isolated incident and posted Derek two vouchers for replacement McOz burgers. He didn’t take up the offer.

However, he did write a song called ‘‘The McMaggot’’, which included the line ‘‘would you like flies with that’’.

THIS brings us to Newcastle City Council. We were thinking about the Labor-Green axing of general manager Ken Gouldthorp.

We were also thinking about flies (there’s been a lot around lately, hence the maggots).

Then it hit us. This whole council business is a bit like Lord of the Flies.

You know the story – a group of children marooned on an island try to govern themselves with terrible results.

Sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

Lord of the Flies 1963​

Lord of the Flies 2013​Email [email protected]杭州龙凤论坛m.au, tweet him @Lakemacjourno, or call on 4973-7709.

Taylor Swift files counterclaim against radio DJ who allegedly groped her

Posted on by

Taylor Swift has filed a counterclaim against a radio DJ she alleges groped her at a promotional event.
杭州龙凤

Former radio DJ David Mueller filed a lawsuit against the singer last month, claiming he was fired from his job and banned from Swift’s concerts following her allegations that he groped her at a meet and greet in Denver, Colorado.

But now Swift has responded, filing a counterclaim which, according to People, alleges Mueller “lifted her skirt and groped her” during the fan event before her concert at the Pepsi Centre in June 2013.

People reports the countersuit details that Mueller admitted an assault occurred at the event, but he blamed his “superior” David Haskell, the program director at Denver’s country radio station, KYGO FM.

“Ms Swift knows exactly who committed the assault – it was Mueller – and she is not confused in the slightest about whether her long-term business acquaintance, Mr Haskell, was the culprit,” the countersuit states.

The countersuit goes on to detail that Swift, 25, was “surprised, upset, offended, and alarmed” following the incident.

“Resolution of this counterclaim will demonstrate that Mueller alone was the perpetrator of the humiliating and wrongful conduct targeted against Ms Swift, and will serve as an example to other women who may resist publicly reliving similar outrageous and humiliating acts.”

Swift is seeking damages and costs, and has requested a jury trial.

The countersuit specifies any surplus damages or costs awarded to Swift following the suit will be donated to “charitable organisations dedicated to protecting women from similar acts of sexual assault and personal disregard”.

David Mueller filed a lawsuit against the Wildest Dreams singer in the US District Court in Denver on September 11.

The Denver Postreports Mueller was attending a meet and greet with his girlfriend as an employee of KYGO FM.

According to Mueller’s suit, Swift was talking to the pair before she “suddenly announced it was picture time” and “quickly put her right arm” around his girlfriend.

Mueller joined the pair for the photo “at the last second”, after which he says Swift thanked the couple and left.

Mueller alleges he later spoke to an unnamed co-worker who “described and demonstrated how he had put his arms around [Swift], hands on her bottom” when it was his turn to meet the singer.

Based on Swift’s countersuit, it seems likely this unnamed co-worker is Haskell.

Mueller lost his job at the station as a result of the incident.

According to People, he had previously been dismissed twice from radio host jobs at other stations and hadn’t been employed as an on-air personality since 2006.

After news of Mueller’s legal action broke, Swift’s representatives said they had provided “evidence” to the radio station of the assault when it occurred, although the decision to fire Mueller came from his employer.

“The radio station was given evidence immediately after the incident,” her representatives told People in a statement. “They made their independent decision.”